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Wider sampling of tumor tissues may guide drug choice, improve outcomes

Source: Science daily

By focusing on genetic variations within a primary tumor, differences between the primary and a metastatic tumor, and additional diversity from tumor DNA in the blood stream, physicians can make better treatment choices for patients with gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma. This study challenges current guidelines and supports evaluation of metastatic lesions and circulating tumor DNA.

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New blood test is more accurate in predicting prostate cancer risk than PSA

Source: Science daily

A new blood test known as IsoPSA detects prostate cancer more precisely than current tests in two crucial measures -- distinguishing cancer from benign conditions, and identifying patients with high-risk disease. By identifying molecular changes in the PSA protein, the findings of this study suggest that once validated, use of IsoPSA may reduce the need for biopsy, and may lower the likelihood of overdetection and overtreatment of nonlethal prostate cancer.

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Screening for thyroid cancer not recommended

Source: Medical xpress

This is a D recommendation, indicating that there is moderate or high certainty that screening has no net benefit or that the harms outweigh the benefits. The incidence of thyroid cancer detection has increased by 4.5 percent per year over the last 10 years, faster than for any other cancer; however, the mortality rate from thyroid cancer has not changed substantially, despite the increase in diagnoses. In 2013, the incidence rate of thyroid cancer in the United States was 15.3 cases per 100,000 persons. Most cases of thyroid cancer have a good prognosis; the 5-year survival rate for thyroid cancer overall is 98.1 percent.

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Skin cancer on the rise

Source: Science daily

New diagnoses for two types of skin cancer increased in recent years, according to a team of researchers. Their paper uses medical records from the Rochester Epidemiology Project to compare diagnoses of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma ? both nonmelanoma skin cancers ? between 2000 and 2010 to diagnoses in prior years.

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Men need more frequent lung cancer screening than women

Source: Science daily

Men need more frequent lung cancer screening than women, according to research presented at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC).

The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual screening for lung cancer with low dose computed tomography (CT) in adults aged 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years.

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Tai chi relieves insomnia in breast cancer survivors

Source: Science news line

If you've ever had insomnia, you know worrying about sleep makes it even harder to fall asleep. For the 30 percent of breast cancer survivors who have insomnia, sleepless nights can lead to depression, fatigue and a heightened risk of disease.

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Medicare beneficiaries face high out-of-pocket costs for cancer treatment

Source: Science Daily

Beneficiaries of Medicare who develop cancer and don’t have supplemental health insurance incur out-of-pocket expenditures for their treatments averaging one-quarter of their income with some paying as high as 63 percent, according to results of a survey-based study.

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Cancer signaling pathway could illuminate new avenue to therapy

Source: Science Daily

Researchers have better defined a pro-growth signaling pathway common to many cancers that, when blocked, kills cancer cells but leaves healthy cells comparatively unharmed.

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Weight loss may help prevent multiple myeloma

Source: Science Daily

Carrying extra weight increases a person's risk that a benign blood disorder will develop into multiple myeloma, a blood cancer. This is particularly true for older, African-American men, say researchers.

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Optimizing frontline immunotherapy in non -small cell lung cancer

Source: Science Daily

Immunotherapy continues to revolutionize the field of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with researchers now focusing on the optimal use of immune agents in the frontline setting.

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Women panic less when abnormal breast cells are not called cancer

Source: Reuters

(Reuters Health) - Women may be less likely to panic or pursue aggressive treatment for a common, non-invasive breast tumor if doctors don’t use the word “cancer” to describe the abnormal cells, an Australian study suggests.

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Blood sample new way of detecting cancer

Source: Science Daily

A new RNA test of blood platelets can be used to detect, classify and pinpoint the location of cancer by analyzing a sample equivalent to one drop of blood. Using this new method for blood-based RNA tests of blood platelets, researchers have been able to identify cancer with 96 per cent accuracy, scientists report.

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Meat Is Linked to Higher Cancer Risk, W.H.O. Report Finds

Source: The New York Times

An international panel of experts convened by theáWorld Health Organizationáconcluded Monday that eating processed meat like hot dogs, ham and bacon raises the risk ofácolon canceráand that consuming other red meats “probably” raises the risk as well. But the increase in risk is so slight that experts said most people should not be overly worried about it.

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Potential new drug targets for aggressive form of lung cancer

Source: MedicalNewsToday

Small cell lung cancer is an aggressive, highly lethal form of the disease that is linked with tobacco use. Researchers have now found mutations and other genetic interruptions occurring in the cancer's development that could translate to potential new drug targets for this disease.

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High vitamin D levels may increase breast cancer survival

Source: MedicalNewsToday

Past studies have claimed that vitamin D may reduce the risk of heart disease, bone fractures and even depression. Now, new research suggests that breast cancer patients with high levels of the vitamin in their blood are more likely to survive the disease than patients with low levels.

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Risk for ovarian cancer increased by being overweight or obese

Source: MedicalNewsToday

Body weight is not a factor that has been widely associated with the the risk of developing ovarian cancer. But new research suggests that women who are overweight or obese are more likely to develop the disease, compared with women of a healthy weight.

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Personalized treatment prolongs the life of lung cancer patients

Source: MedicalNewsToday

The National Cancer Institute (INCan) has progressed from a rate of nine months of survival to 30 with personalized treatments for patients diagnosed with lung cancer in metastatic stage, i.e., when the disease has spread to different parts of the body.

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Promising treatment for stubborn blood cancers

Source: MedicalNewsToday

A pill that suppresses a key regulator of cancer growth may provide hope to relapsed leukemia and lymphoma patients running out of treatment options for their aggressive, treatment-resistant disease, according to three reports* published online in Blood, the journal of the American Society of Hematology

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Risk of prostate cancer death decreased by PSA-testing and early treatment

Source: MedicalNewsToday

Mortality in prostate cancer is lower in areas with frequent use of PSA testing compared with areas with little testing shows a study published online in Journal of the National Cancer Institute by researchers from Umeň University, Sweden and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.

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Surgery better than watchful waiting for younger prostate cancer patients

Source: MedicalNewsToday

A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that mortality rates are lower for younger men having surgery for prostate cancer, compared with those who follow watchful waiting.

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Colorectal cancer: the risk factors, symptoms and importance of screening

Source:MedicalNewsToday

According to the American Cancer Society, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is around 1 in 20. But according to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are more than 20 million adults in the US who have never had the recommended screening for the disease, putting them at higher risk of dying from a preventable condition.

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Weight loss reduces cancer risk in overweight women

Source: Fox News

Overweight or obese women who lose at least 5 percent of their body weight may lower their levels of the type of inflammation linked with cancer, according to a new study.

The findings show that women who dieted, exercised and lost weight saw their levels of an inflammation marker called C-reactive protein drop by 42 percent, and lowered their levels of another inflammation marker linked to cancer, called interleukin-6, by 23 percent over the course of a year.

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Cancer survivors urged to exercise and eat healthy in new guidelines

Source: CBS News

New guidelines from the American Cancer Society urge people who beat cancer to exercise and eat healthier: It just may provide a better chance of preventing the cancer from coming back.

That's not something most doctors do, said Dr. Omer Kucuk, an Emory University oncologist who has researched the effect of nutrition on prostate cancer. Most doctors discuss surgery, chemotherapy or other treatments for their patients.

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Shift in bladder cancer management

Source: DailyRX

Bladder cancer likes to return after treatment. It also tends to get worse - going from what's called non muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) to a form that invades surrounding tissue.

Researchers looked at this natural progression and have some new ideas.

Current surveillance and treatment methods for bladder cancer aren't working very well, according to a group of British researchers. They're suggesting it's time for a paradigm shift.

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Melanoma: catching and curing skin cancer

Source: Medical Breakthrough

Some say the number of cases is growing at an epidemic rate! In fact, melanoma is the fastest growing cancer in the U.S. Now, science is moving forward to detect it sooner and cure it faster.

We love the sun and we can die from it! Every eight minutes someone in the United States will be diagnosed with melanoma.

"Your mind goes all different places, like how is this going to affect my life?" Megan Brinker, a melanoma survivor, told Ivanhoe.

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Early biomarker for pancreatic cancer identified

Source: Science Daily

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have identified a new biomarker and therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer, an often-fatal disease for which there is currently no reliable method for early detection or therapeutic intervention.

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Soybeans soaked in warm water naturally release key cancer-fighting substance

Source: Science Daily

Soybeans soaking in warm water could become a new "green" source for production of a cancer-fighting substance now manufactured in a complicated and time-consuming industrial process, scientists are reporting in ACS'Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

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Breakthrough in bile duct cancer with discovery of new gene mutations

Source: Science Daily

A team of international scientists has made a significant breakthrough in understanding the cause of bile duct cancer, a deadly type of liver cancer. By identifying several new genes frequently mutated in bile duct cancers, researchers are paving the way for better understanding of how bile duct cancers develop.

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Novel approach to stimulate immune cells

Source: Science Daily

Researchers at Rutgers University have uncovered a new way to stimulate activity of immune cell opiate receptors, leading to efficient tumor cell clearance.

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Molecular subtypes and genetic alterations may determine response to lung cancer therapy

Source: Science Daily

Cancer therapies targeting specific molecular subtypes of the disease allow physicians to tailor treatment to a patient's individual molecular profile. But scientists are finding that in many types of cancer the molecular subtypes are more varied than previously thought and contain further genetic alterations that can affect a patient's response to therapy.

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Stopping hormone therapy might help breast cancer to regress

Source - Science Daily

As soon as women quit hormone therapy, their rates of new breast cancer decline, supporting the hypothesis that stopping hormones can lead to tumor regression, according to a report e-published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, & Prevention.

Some have suggested that the decline in use of hormone therapy may have caused the fall in the breast cancer rate, perhaps by making tumors regress, Dr. Buist explained. But others have countered that the explanation for the declines in both breast cancer and hormone use might instead be that because former hormone users are less concerned about breast cancer or see their doctors less often, they may get less screening mammography than do women who have never taken hormones.

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Glow-in-the-dark for monitoring throat cancer

Source - daily Rx

Barrett's esophagus is a condition where long-standing indigestion, also known as acid reflux, causes the cells in the throat to change, raising the risk of esophageal cancer.

 A group from Cambridge's MRC Cancer Cell Unit developed a technique to spray a fluorescent dye over the throat during endoscopy. This makes the precanceous areas glow brightly so physicians are able see the right area that needs to be sampled for biopsy.

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ACP calls for colon cancer screening at 50

Source - MedPage Today

Colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 50 for all average-risk individuals, according to a new clinical guideline from the American College of Physicians (ACP).

Fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), flexible sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy are acceptable screening methods for patients with an average risk for colorectal cancer.

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How cruciferous veggies crucify cancer

Source - dailyRx

Ya either love 'em or you hate 'em. You know those cruciferous vegetables that are among the best things for you on and from the earth. Scientists are getting to know more about why broccoli blocks cancer.

Suforaphane, the amazing and versatile compound found in cruciferous vegetables, provides two ways to prevent the formation of cancer. 

Broccoli is overflowing with sulforaphane, which is also found in other cruciferous vegetables like cauliflower and kale.

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Outfoxing the cancer fox

Source - daily Rx

Cancer cell protein FOXM1 inhibitors may boost power of chemotherapy.

Part of the life cycle of a cell - as with every other living thing - is death. Cancer cells have to be pounded by radiation or chemotherapy to die or actually commit suicide. Scientists may have discovered what interferes with that death.

A protein that appears in large quantities in cancer - FOXM1 - apparently outfoxes radiation and chemotherapy, keeping cancer cells from dying.

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A vast horizon - cancer vaccines

Source - dailyRx

Cancer vaccines being developed to treat a number of cancers.

In 2010, the first cancer vaccine - Provenge (sipuleucel-T) - was approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) to treat metastatic prostate cancer. This type of treatment as spawned an entire new field.

A number of therapeutic cancer vaccines are currently being tested in clinical trials around the world to treat a variety of malignancies. 

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Cancer risk higher for kids with arthritis

Source - CBS NEWS

Children with juvenile arthritis develop cancer four times more often than children without the disease, but the treatments they receive -- including biologic treatments like Enbrel - may not explain their increased risk, according to a new study.

If confirmed, researchers say the findings should ease fears that biologic treatments known as TNF inhibitors cause cancer in children and young adults.

Compared to children without JIA, children with the rheumatic disease had a 4.4-times greater cancer risk. Treatment with a TNF inhibitor did not appear to influence this risk. The main TNF inhibitor reported used by children in the JIA group was Enbrel.

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Beauty products and cancer: know the facts

Source - PR Newswire

Have you dyed or relaxed your hair? Do you put on lipstick before you head out to work? Do you paint your nails? Many Hispanic women have a beauty routine or beauty products that they regularly use. Have you ever worried that yours might increase your risk for cancer? Before you panic and cancel your appointment at the salon, read on—it's time to break down some beauty-related cancer fact and fiction.

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Cancer-drug shortage filled, at least for now

Source - Fox News

Federal regulators have approved new suppliers for two crucial cancer drugs, easing critical shortages that had been ratcheting up fears that patients, particularly children with leukemia, would miss lifesaving treatments.

But 283 prescription drugs are currently in short supply or unavailable nationwide, and regulators and manufacturers say shortages are a long-term problem that will continue to give patients and doctors nightmares.

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Technology grades cells to predict cancer

Source - dailyRX

Folks with severe acid reflux can develop a pre-cancerous condition known as Barrett's esophagus that needs to be watched carefully. A new piece of equipment may help doctors detect the earliest stages of cancer.

Research on using a new microscopic technique to evaluate abnormal cells from patients with Barrett's esophagus showed improvement over the current method, raising the accuracy of detecting abnormal cells in a given biopsy to 89 percent.

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FDA Approves Advanced Basal Cell Cancer Drug

SourcedailyRX

Roche announced that Erivedge (vismodegib) capsule was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for adults with a type of skin cancer, called basal cell carcinoma (BCC), that has spread to other parts of the body or that has come back after surgery or that their healthcare provider decides cannot be treated with surgery or radiation.

Erivedge is the first FDA-approved medicine for people with advanced forms of the most common skin cancer. It is a capsule that is taken orally once-a-day.

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Get off and stay off the cancer couch

Source - Daily Rx

If you've lived with cancer, you know it zaps your energy. It's easy to hit the couch and stay there. But you do so at the peril of your health and well-being. Get up and get moving to keep moving beyond cancer!

It's official: a study published on bmj.com (the website of the British Medical Journal) proves that after major cancer treatment is complete, physical activity can - and does - improve a person's health and quality of life.

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Extending lives of men with prostate cancer

Source - Daily Rx

Usually, drug companies are the organizations that discover new medicines. It's rare for drugs to come out of academic labs, but that's just what happened with the first medication found to be effective against advanced prostate cancer.

A new drug still under investigation - MDV3100 - has been shown to help men with advanced prostate cancer live months longer. It works by blocking the cell receptor that drives the growth and spread of prostate cancer.

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Cancer deaths - enormous drop over last 20 years, USA

SourceMedical News Today

Over the last twenty years, more than one million deaths from cancer have been avoided, researchers reported in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. Death rates for the most common cancers, including colon, breast, prostate and lung cancers have been dropping steadily year after year. However, some rarer cancers, such has kidney, thyroid, liver and pancreas cancers have seen death rates and total incidences rise.

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New colorectal cancer drug shows promise in study

SourceLos Angeles Times

A medication for people with advanced colorectal cancer who have exhausted all other treatment options appears to slow tumor growth and extend life, according to new data.

Bayer HealthCare, the makers of regorafenib, said it would seek Food and Drug Administration approval of the medication this year. If approved, regorafenib would be the first new treatment for colorectal cancer in more than five years.

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Cancer patients keep their hair!

Source - Ivanhoe Newswire

Hair loss, it’s one of the most obvious signs of cancer treatment. Many of the drugs used in chemotherapy for diseases like breast cancer cause all or the most of the patient’s hair to fall out, but as one woman found out, a cool new therapy currently being studied is changing that.

Cheryl discovered a clinical trial testing an investigational system designed to prevent chemo-induced hair loss.

“I am literally hooked up to machine that acts like an air conditioner and it reduces the scalp to 42 degrees,” Cheryl said.

A coolant circulates through a silicone cap, causing blood flow to hair follicles to constrict. There are some concerns doing that could create a place for cancer cells to hide during chemo treatments, but studies in Europe and Asia, where the cap is widely available, show it’s safe and effective.

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Prostate cancer linked to meat consumption

Source - Ivanhoe Newswire

Cheeseburgers and hot dogs, it's the American way. But do these foods increase your risk of prostate cancer? According to this study, progressive prostate cancer is more likely when foods like ground beef and processed meats are frequently consumed.

The research team, led by John Witte of the University of California, San Francisco, also found that the correlation was primarily driven by red meat that was grilled or barbequed, especially when well done.

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Study: Bone drug boosts breast cancer survival

Source - USA TODAY

Doctors were mostly hoping to prevent complications and relapses when they gave young women a medicine to keep their bones strong during breast cancer treatment. Seven years later, they found it did more than that: The bone drug improved survival, as much as many chemotherapies do.

The study found a 37 percent lower risk of death among women who received the bone drug, Zometa. In absolute terms, it meant that 4 to 5 more women out of every 100 were alive seven years later.

It's especially impressive considering that the women took the drug, given as an infusion every six months, for only three years.

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New treatment: Cancer vaccines

FRIDAY, November 11, 2011 — Treating cancer could start even before you know you have it. Cancer vaccines are game changers in the fight against the most common forms of this deadly disease.

There are no cures for prostate, breast and ovarian cancers, but now there is new hope.

"I want to be part of something that works and so people won't die at a young age and can benefit from it," Bud Dougherty, prostate cancer vaccine patient, told Ivanhoe.

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Colorectal Cancer: Jumping Gene Named Sleeping Beauty Plays Vital Role in Investigating Cancer Pathway

SUNDAY, November 6, 2011 — A jumping gene with the fairy tale name 'Sleeping Beauty' has helped to unlock vital clues for researchers investigating the genetics of colorectal cancer.

A new study used the Sleeping Beauty transposon system to profile the repertoire of genes that can drive colorectal cancer, identifying many more than previously thought. Around one third of these genes are mutated in human cancer, which provides strong evidence that they are driver mutations in human tumours.

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Delivering Chemotherapy to the Liver May Benefit Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

TUESDAY, October 4, 2011 — For patients with melanoma of the eye (ocular or uveal melanoma) that has spread to the liver, a new technique may delay the progression of the disease better than current treatments, new research suggests. The technique, called percutaneous hepatic perfusion, delivers chemotherapy directly to the liver, sparing other parts of the body from the drug's effects.

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Rising Oropharyngeal Cancer Rates Linked to HPV Infection

TUESDAY, October 4, 2011 — A new study provides evidence that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection may be responsible for the rise in incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), a type of head and neck cancer. The research suggests that if these trends continue, by 2020 HPV-positive OPSCC will likely surpass cervical cancer as the most common HPV-associated cancer in the United States. The findings were published online October 3 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Sound Waves Ending Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY 16 August, 2011 — A new technique may be able to remove prostate cancer in patients without any incisions. For patients whose cancer returned after radiation treatment was conducted, Tulane University School of Medicine urologist Dr. Benjamin R. Lee has been studying a new clinical trial analyzing this potential treatment.

The treatment is called High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, or HIFU, and uses ultrasound energy, sound waves, to quickly heat tissue to destroy cancer cells.

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Cancer: the good news

TUESDAY August 02, 2011 — Some of those genes are key to processes that protect us against cancer, such as DNA repair or detoxing – turning on enzymes that help us excrete carcinogens more rapidly," says Pecorino. She adds that, along with the gene-regulating qualities of vitamins A and D, our knowledge about which other foods have similar powers is "set to explode in the next few years".

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Sun, heat a risk for cancer patients

MONDAY, August 01, 2011 — Because of their treatment, cancer patients are at higher risk from the sun so they should take precautions, US physicians advise. "Cancer patients may be more at risk for sun damage because of their treatment," Dr. Elizabeth Kvale director of outpatient supportive care and survivorship at University of Alabama at Birmingham and associate scientist in the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center, says in a statement.

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Breast Cancer Cases Rise in U.S.

THURSDAY, July 31, 2011 — Since 2000, breast cancer cases have declines, but recently, the National Cancer Institute found that estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer have increased since 2003.

Estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer is the most common type of breast cancer. Alternatively, estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer rates have been declining since 1992. This decline can be attributed to better treatment options and earlier detection through the use of mammograms.  More interesting, estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer is the most difficult to treat and can lead to death.

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The North Cypress Cancer Center has been recognized by the Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC).

In 2007 the community of Cypress, Texas, a thriving suburb of greater Houston, welcomed the opening of the North Cypress Medical Center. The new facility is the realization of a vision for high-tech healthcare delivered in a high-touch environment. To serve this growing community, North Cypress Medical Center Founder, Chairman, and CEO, and University of Stanford-trained radiation oncologist Robert Behar, MD, envisioned an environment of care designed with the patient's comfort in mind.

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NORTH CYPRESS SPONSORS CY-FAIR INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT'S "TEAMING UP FOR A CURE"

North Cypress Medical Center provided the title sponsorship for the Cy-Fair Independent School District's "Teaming Up for a Cure" event, which consisted of two local high school women's basketball games resulting in a $5,000 donation to the Houston Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure.

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NORTH CYPRESS' PROJECT PINK RAISES $50,000 FOR HOUSTON KOMEN AFFILIATE

On October 16th, the beautiful North Cypress lobby turned pink for Project Pink, North Cypress Medical Center's annual event benefiting the Houston Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure. Over 300 members of the community were in attendance to help in the fight against breast cancer to raise $50,000 for a cause that has touched so many.

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NORTH CYPRESS CANCER CENTER RECEIVES AWARD FROM HOUSTON AFFILIATE OF SUSAN G KOMEN

North Cypress Medical Center was given the Hope Award for Ambassadorship by the Houston Affiliate of Susan G Komen for the Cure at their annual "Pink Tie Gala" on Saturday March 6th. North Cypress was chosen for this honor in recognition of the support given to Komen through the hospital's annual Project Pink seminar, luncheon, and style show. This award is presented to businesses, individuals, or organizations whose generous support has significantly assisted the Komen Houston Affiliate in their mission to save lives and end breast cancer.

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DON JULIO'S DONATES $7,000 TO THE NORTH CYPRESS CANCER CENTER

Cypress, TX, 8/26/10- The North Cypress Cancer Center was presented with a $7,000 donation from Don Julio's Mexican Restaurant on Thursday, August 19, 2010. The monetary donation will be used by North Cypress Medical Center to help directly assist the patients of the North Cypress Cancer Center.

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Cypress Cancer Specialists
Behar, Robert, M.D. Cypress Behar, Robert, M.D.
Radiation Oncology
Tel: 832-912-3650
Cypress Oncologists
Cypress Cancer Specialists
King, Karl, M.D. King, Karl, M.D.
Radiation Oncology
Tel: 832-912-3650
King, Karl, M.D.
Cypress Cancer Specialists
Laurent Gressot, M.D. Gressot, Laurent, M.D.
Medical Oncology
Tel: 832-678-4888
Laurent Gressot, M.D.
Cypress Cancer Specialists
Yen, Charles L., M.D. Yen, Charles L., M.D.
Radiation Oncology
Tel: 281-440-5006
Yen, Charles L., M.D.
Cypress Cancer Specialists
David Hodges, MD David Hodges, MD
Medical Oncology
Tel: 281-949-5201
Yen, Charles L., M.D.
Cypress Cancer Specialists
Sandy Itwaru, MD Sandy Itwaru, MD
Medical Oncology
Tel: 281-949-5201
Sandy Itwaru, MD
Cypress Radiation Oncologists
Chemo Treatment, Cypress Texas
Cancer Screening Cypress Houston Texas
Cancer Surgery Cypress
Body Radiosurgery Cypress
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